Chile presents National Strategy on Forests and Climate Change

Carbon credits from Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) verified for the first time.

The Nature Conservancy announces the first successful verification of carbon credits in Chile from Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD), from the Valdivian Coastal Reserve.

Angelo Sartori, Chief of the Climate Change Unit of the Chilean Government’s National Forestry Service, will present Chile’s National Strategy on Forests and Climate Change, which integrates carbon sequestration with forest management in the country.

Tropical deforestation and forest degradation is a leading cause of climate change, generating approximately 15% of total human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, and is a threat to global biodiversity and millions of poor people who depend on forests for their livelihoods.

The successful verification of the first carbon credits from Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) in Chile, under the rules of the Verified Carbon Standard, is an important milestone for Chile’s National Strategy on Forests and Climate Change, driven by the Agriculture Ministry and the Chilean Government’s National Forestry Service.

These credits have been verified from a project at the Valdivian Coastal Reserve, a protected area that The Nature Conservancy acquired in the south of Chile ten years ago. The Valdivian Coastal Reserve’s old growth forests store the equivalent of more than 800 tons of carbon dioxide per hectare, making these forests among the most carbon-dense in the world.

With the actions taken to stop deforestation and conversion of these native forests, more than 350,000 tons of CO2 emissions are estimated to have been prevented from being released into the atmosphere—the equivalent of taking more than 67,000 passenger vehicles off U.S. roads for one full year.

Source | http://www.nature.org.

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