March 2016 Was the Most Abnormally Warm Month on Record For the World, NOAA Says

Earth’s global temperatures in March 2016 were the most abnormally warm on record for any month, according to NOAA. This is the second month in a row that this remarkable feat has occurred.

NOAA’s global State of the Climate report released recently found March’s temperature over the Earth’s surface was 1.22 degrees Celsius above the 20th century average, not only crushing the warmest March in the 137-year period of record set just one year prior, but also the largest temperature anomaly of any month in NOAA’s database dating to 1880.

The previous record for the largest temperature anomaly on record in a given month was just set this past February. March beat out that record by a narrow margin of 0.01 degrees Celcius.

March 2016 is also the eleventh consecutive month in a row that the earth has recorded its warmest respective month on record.

In addition to NOAA, three other agencies confirmed that this past March was the warmest on record.

The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) calculated the global mean March 2016 temperature was 0.62 degrees Celsius (about 1.1 degrees Fahrenheit) above the March 30-year average from 1981-2010.

A second analysis from NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies also concluded March anomalies were the highest in their period of record dating to 1880, a whopping 1.28 degrees Celsius above the 1951-1980 average period.

A few tenths of a degree may not sound overwhelming, but in the world of climate statistics, computed from worldwide temperatures, this is yet another record-shattering figure.

In fact, this warm anomaly doubled the previous record for the month of March in the JMA’s database, +0.31 degrees Celsius, set the previous year, 2015.

Similarly, NASA found the March 2016 anomaly crushed the previous March record by over 0.3 degrees.

A third analysis from the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) also found March 2016 to be a record-setter for the month, 0.80 degrees Celsius above the 30-year average, though records date only to 1979.

As has been the case in recent months, the highest temperature anomalies in March were in the highest latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

The C3S analysis found temperatures over 6 degrees Celsius (about 10 degrees Fahrenheit) above March averages over much of the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, Barents Sea, Kara Sea, Alaska, northwest Canada, parts of central Asia and Siberia.

Generally above-average March temperatures were seen in the mid-latitudes and tropics both north and south of the equator, with the exceptions of eastern Canada, the North Atlantic Ocean, western Europe, northwest Africa, and central South America.

Much of Antarctica, however, was cooler than average in March, with the exception of the Antarctic Peninsula, Coats Land and Queen Maud Land.

It was a record warm March in Australia, according to the country’s Bureau of Meteorology, which was followed by the hottest April day on record in Sydney.

March also topped one of the warmest first three months of the year on record in the United States.

NOAA-march-2016

March 2016 marked the 11th consecutive month global temperatures set records for that particular month in the JMA and NOAA databases.

NOAA said that this is the longest stretch of months in a row where the earth has set a new monthly temperature record dating back 137 years.

A second analysis from NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies also concluded March anomalies were the highest in their period of record dating to 1880, a whopping 1.28 degrees Celsius above the 1951-1980 average period.

A few tenths of a degree may not sound overwhelming, but in the world of climate statistics, computed from worldwide temperatures, this is yet another record-shattering figure.

In fact, this warm anomaly doubled the previous record for the month of March in the JMA’s database, +0.31 degrees Celsius, set the previous year, 2015.

Similarly, NASA found the March 2016 anomaly crushed the previous March record by over 0.3 degrees.

A third analysis from the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) also found March 2016 to be a record-setter for the month, 0.80 degrees Celsius above the 30-year average, though records date only to 1979.

As has been the case in recent months, the highest temperature anomalies in March were in the highest latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

The C3S analysis found temperatures over 6 degrees Celsius (about 10 degrees Fahrenheit) above March averages over much of the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, Barents Sea, Kara Sea, Alaska, northwest Canada, parts of central Asia and Siberia.

Generally above-average March temperatures were seen in the mid-latitudes and tropics both north and south of the equator, with the exceptions of eastern Canada, the North Atlantic Ocean, western Europe, northwest Africa, and central South America.

Much of Antarctica, however, was cooler than average in March, with the exception of the Antarctic Peninsula, Coats Land and Queen Maud Land.

It was a record warm March in Australia, according to the country’s Bureau of Meteorology, which was followed by the hottest April day on record in Sydney.

Six straight months in NASA’s analysis have exceeded a 1 degree Celsius monthly anomaly, something that had not happened a single time before dating to 1880.

Perhaps even more impressive, nine of the 10 largest monthly warm anomalies in the 125-year JMA analysis record have occurred from May 2015 through March 2016. Only February 1998, on the heels of another strong El Niño, remains in the JMA’s top 10 list.

Climate scientists emphasize that whether a given month is a fraction of a degree warmer or cooler than a previous month isn’t as important as the long-term, overall trend.

And that trend of warm anomalies over the past year or so has become disconcerting, not simply due to the record-tying strong El Niño, but also the degree of higher northern latitude warming.

Via – weather.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s